Bonus Features: Inside the Opening of the Ontario Science Centre

Before diving into this post, check out my TVO article about the opening of the Ontario Science Centre in 1969.

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Globe and Mail, April 28, 1965.

In his notes on the project written in January 1965, Moriyama compared the project to a striptease…

The complex will be a “strip-tease,” never exposing all. Let it begin with a mundane beginning. Let it unfold more and more as the people work at it and with it. With the change in sunlight, moonlight, rain and the season, it will keep eluding the finality. Let them return and keep returning until they discover that even the screw head is calculated.

But remember that the most important is the total gestalt. Where architecture ends and exhibits begin should be blurred.

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The front cover of promotional material produced by the province in 1966 under the complex’s original name. The pamphlet begins with a quote from Premier John Robarts: “We are planting a seed from which will grow an undertaking of international significance.”

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This is the story of a Centennial project designed to grow with Canada.

Officially is the salute of the Province of Ontario to the nation’s first century of Confederation.

But it is not just a commemoration of the past. It is an investment in Canada’s present and future in a world of accelerating change.

The Centennial Centre of Science and Technology will be a unique public institution–combining many characteristics and functions of museum, school, university and exhibition.

It will be devoted to helping people of all ages understand the scientific revolution and the impact of technological advances on their lives.

Its ultimate concern will be the welfare of Man himself and his progress toward a better life.

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The pamphlet ends with a promise that the complex will enrich Ontario’s tourism industry and bring conventions to Toronto. A few final words from Minister of Tourism and Information James Auld: “The Centennial Centre of Science and Technology can help people of all ages sharpen their view of the past and adjust to the change that are being demanded of them today. It can give them a clearer idea of the kind of life that lies ahead and how they can make it better than it might otherwise be.”

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Toronto Star, August 20, 1968.

A preview presentation was planned for the 1967 CNE, but as the project fell behind, officials decided it would be too much of a distraction from completing the complex. The following year exhibits focusing on reproduction were shown at the fair.

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Allan Robb Fleming’s logo for the centre, as seen on the cover of a promotional book produced in 1969.

Moriyama’s notes on the logo: “Symbolically, our ideal can be represented by three interlocking circles–man, science and nature–as natural as water, land and air. The fact it appears like a trillium, the logo for the province, is interesting and a definite plus.”

The book is very much a product of its time. The first half is a collage of images, prose, and poetry assembled by Lister Sinclair to “help us understand science and the world in which we live.” If you recall Sinclair’s long run as host of CBC Radio’s Ideas, you can picture him reading this section aloud, accompanied by appropriate music.

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The second half presents 14 pages of line drawings of exhibits. Flipping through this section will be nostalgic to anyone who visited the centre over its first few decades.

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Two of the most popular opening exhibits are seen here: the kalimbas and the bicycle generators.

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Globe and Mail, September 27, 1969.

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Toronto Star, September 27, 1969.

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Lineup when the Ontario Science Centre opened to the general public, September 28, 1969. Photo by Dick Darrell. Toronto Star Photo Archive, Toronto Reference Library, tspa_0110370f.

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Key to Toronto, October 1969.

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“Physics. By Pulling down on the lever and raising the weight, Sandra learns about the principles of leverage. Here, since the fulcrum is so close to handle, it takes more effort.” Photo by Reg Innell, originally published in the December 27, 1969 edition of the Toronto Star. Toronto Star Photo Archive, Toronto Reference Library, tspa_0110351f.

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Toronto Star, December 27, 1969.

Vintage Toronto Ads: Carpet with Civic Fibres

Originally published on Torontoist on February 16, 2007.

Next time you visit the library, take a look at the carpeting and furniture. Does it make you want to linger with a good book or run through the checkout as fast as possible?
2007_02_16MRLcarpet.jpgThe Toronto Reference Library, which celebrates its 30th anniversary in November, was breaking itself in when today’s ad appeared. Judging from the number of people seen sleeping there, the carpet colours may be too easy on some readers’ eyes. Architect Raymond Moriyama’s design, with carpeted walls, easy-to-browse open shelves and the 70s see-through elevator, lends a comforting, cozy feel, turning short trips into lengthy stays, especially in winter. Moriyama’s firm is still involved in the building, contributing to its renewal plan.
 
The Reference Library’s roots date back to 1830, with the establishment of the Toronto Mechanics’ Institute (originally named York, until the city changed its name in 1834). Modeled after similar groups formed in Great Britain during the 1820s, its aim, according to Robertson’s Landmarks of Toronto, was “the mutual improvement of mechanics and others who become members of the society in arts and sciences by the formation of a library of reference and circulation, by the delivery of lectures on scientific and mechanical subjects embraced by this constitution from which all discussion of political or religious matters is to be carefully excluded.”

Originally located on Colborne St, the Institute moved to the northeast corner of Church and Adelaide in the mid-1850s. By 1858, the library consisted of 4,000 books, available to 800 paying members. A city bylaw passed in 1883 established a free public library system, which the Mechanics’ Institute was folded into. When the library opened to full public access the following spring, the rush of people wishing to use it quickly led to increased staff and multiple copies of popular titles.

In 1903, the city received a Carnegie grant to build a new central library and several branches, including Yorkville, Queen/Lisgar (now used by the city’s Public Health department) and Riverdale. When the new Toronto Reference Library opened at St. George and College in 1909, it contained nearly 100,000 books. The Institute building remained a branch through the late 1920s, the was used as offices by the city’s public welfare department until it was demolished in the late 1940s.
In 1967, the Metropolitan Toronto Library Board was established to handle the reference library and special collections acquired over the years. Moriyama presented his design in 1970, with construction underway by 1975. The old library was sold to the University of Toronto and now serves as the Koffler Student Services Centre, which includes the main branch of the U of T Bookstore.

Source: Saturday Night, March 1978.