1933 Mail and Empire Women’s Pages 5: From Chowder to Pigeon

me 1933-03-06 header

me 1933-03-18 ann adam chowder collection

Mail and Empire, March 18, 1933.

Missing from this list of chowders is the kind you might expect: clam. The first printed recipe using the term, published in Boston in 1751, reads like poetry.

me 1933-03-18 norma shearer

Mail and Empire, March 18, 1933.

One of the few pieces on celebrities to slip into the M&E’s women’s pages so far during our look at them. Norma Shearer did not appear in any films during 1933, returning to the screen in Riptide in March 1934. As for her two-year-old son, Irving Thalberg Jr. grew up to be a philosophy professor.

And now a word from our sponsor…

me 1933-03-18 shredded wheat ad

Mail and Empire, March 18, 1933.

me 1933-03-20 woman's point of view on teachers and weather

Mail and Empire, March 20, 1933.

Bride Broder’s moaning about late winter weather in Toronto is not a recent development.

me 1933-03-20 lemonade

Mail and Empire, March 20, 1933.

Let’s embrace spring and make some fresh lemonade syrup.

me 1933-03-21 potatoes and dressed for dessert

Mail and Empire, March 21, 1933. 

me 1933-03-23 wee cakes

Mail and Empire, March 23, 1933

A double-dose of Ann and Katherine for you, heavy on desserts and sweet treats.

me 1933-03-23 woman's page on immigrants

Mail and Empire, March 23, 1933. 

A suggestion to create community gardens in poor areas of the city in the midst of the Great Depression. Note the nod to The Ward, a historical Toronto neighbourhood which has been the subject of much research and reexamination in recent years.

me 1933-03-24 illustration

Mail and Empire, March 24, 1933.

me 1933-03-24 easy sunday dinner do you know this utensil

Mail and Empire, March 24, 1933. 

These days, pigeon is not a meat you can easily walk into a supermarket to buy. And it’s not a dish that gets much publicity. But modern recipes can be found, such as this one from Jamie Oliver’s site.

A quick Googling also found that contraptions similar to today’s featured utensil exist, even though I’ve never seen one in action.