Vintage Toronto Ads: What Does He Want from Mr. Mort?

Originally published on Torontoist on February 26, 2013.

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Don Mills Mirror, December 16, 1970.

Did the boys at Mr. Mort’s succeed in their quest to make heroines out of girlfriends/partners/wives determined to give their man the most stylish winter threads 1970 had to offer? Or did those men stumble upon this ad and shake their heads in disbelief at what this groovy clothier had to offer?

The main figure in the ad is decked out in a finely tailored suit, apparently named after a brand of house paint. The description doesn’t indicate if customers can use paint chips to select the perfect colour combinations to weave into the smart, checked pattern.

Model B–C shows off Mr. Mort’s casual combination. This outfit is ideal for swinging get-togethers with other couples, hitting the party scene, or, with sunglasses on, driving down the highway with the radio at full blast. But be careful—the police might ticket you for driving under the influence of fine fashion!

Model D—the “leathers are in” gent—is definitely a man on the move. His ensemble is ideal for a mod mob enforcer, a primped-up pimp, a sharp-dressed bank robber, or a small-time radical terrorist. It’s an outfit any man would wear with pride on the day they suddenly decide to hijack a plane to Cuba.

Don’t forget the finishing touches! The vest scarf is a fantastic item for keeping any neck warm, but proper sizing is important. Mr. Mort does not take any responsibility for customers who accidentally choke themselves by buttoning up too tightly. Your heroine will thank you for continuing to breathe.

BEHIND THE SCENES

And so, after six years, the first run of “Vintage Toronto Ads” ended. Perhaps it was appropriate the last subject was named “Mort.”

The series wasn’t as popular as other material Torontoist published, thus not making it worth the premium rate (relatively speaking) I received as a staff writer. As for why there’s no indication that this was the end, there was talk of occasionally reviving it for gallery-style posts. A revival lasted from November 2014 to August 2015.

Vintage Toronto Ads: April Showers Bring Free Trousers

Originally published on Torontoist on April 10, 2012.

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The News, April 19, 1912.

1912: Take a decent head shot of the store owner/employee/mascot and place it on a nattily-dressed cartoon body. Frame ad with promises of “free trousers.” Appeal to the customer’s sense of being a smart consumer who knows to spend money when he senses clothing that will make him the fashionable envy of his friends. Use period phrases like “swell.” Wait for customers to rush in.

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Toronto Sun, April 9, 1980.

1980: Take four models. Strip them of their trousers, but leave them with the featured blazers and sports jackets so that they won’t freeze during the photo shoot. Update “trousers” to “pants.” Mention the “free pants” offer in boldface at the top of the ad, but take a quieter approach throughout the rest of the ad. Ask at least one model to adopt a wide-mouthed smile to reinforce the slightly cheeky nature of the ad. Avoid use of phrases like “swell.” Wait for customers to rush in.

Vintage Toronto Ads: Union-Friendly Garments

Originally published on Torontoist on January 31, 2012.

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Citizen and Country, May 4, 1900.

Given the whiff of union-bashing in the air as municipal labour strife looms, it’s hard to imagine a headline such as the one employed here by clothier Philip Jamieson being created by a similar business these days. While today’s vintage ad appeared in a publication dedicated to covering the union movement, it does suggest that not all employers at the time abhorred their unionized workers.

Philip Jamieson established his clothing business soon after arriving from Scotland in 1873. By the time the above ad was published, the firm was located in a curved building at 2 Queen Street West designed by architects Samuel Curry and Francis S. Baker. Over the years, the building’s tenants have included Woolworth’s, Tower Records, GoodLife Fitness, Coast Mountain Sports, and Atmosphere.

Next time you wander in 2 Queen West for sports apparel, ask the cashier if you’ll receive a discount for flashing the United Garment Workers of America logo or a label from the union it later merged into, the United Food and Commercial Workers.

Vintage Toronto Ads: No Tricks—Just Treats

Originally published on Torontoist on October 25, 2011.

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Toronto Sun, October 26, 1980.

Ghouls definitely aren’t fools when it comes to style or a bargain. Never mind if the garments from a purveyor of affordable clothing for teenagers might not be top of the line—if you’re dressing as a zombie, tears to clothing resulting from their first visit to a laundry machine only add to the illusion.

As for how campy a cowboy hat could be, keep in mind that today’s ad appeared in the wake of the box office smash Urban Cowboy. It’s likely Stitches was appealing to John Travolta wannabes who planned to spend their Halloween riding a mechanical bull or engaging in other forms of western-themed horseplay.

We sympathize with the guy on the right, who spent months mastering the art of sticking his tongue out like Gene Simmons only to discover every Kiss costume in the city was sold out. He couldn’t even find a Kiss Your Face Makeup Kit that would provide proper instructions on how to look like his musical idols.

Vintage Toronto Ads: Short Cuts 1

Some weeks while working on Vintage Toronto Ads my mind overflowed with ideas. Others, whether due to brain fog, a heavy load at my then day job, or a hectic personal life, produced ridiculously short pieces I’m amazed the editors accepted. Rather than give all of those pieces their own posts, I’m collecting them in batches such as this.

Suitable Attire

Originally published on Torontoist on July 29, 2008.

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The Globe, May 12, 1883.

While P. Jamieson tried to raise a ruckus with their dare to the dozen or so other dry goods retailers located in the vicinity of Queen and Yonge, two competitors would have the last laugh—T. Eaton and R. Simpson expanded rapidly after 1883, with the early versions of their landmark stores in place by the end of the 19th century.

Who Are the Educational Trustees in Your Neighbourhood?

Originally published on Torontoist on September 2, 2008.

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The Leaside Story, 1958.

With today marking the first day back to school for most students in the city, we take this opportunity to let parents know who runs the institutions that will mould your children into upstanding young citizens…or at least the people who ran the show in Leaside 50 years ago.

Founded in 1920, the Leaside Board of Education operated out of Leaside High School by the time today’s ad appeared. Besides the high school, the board’s responsibilities in 1958 included three public schools (Bessborough, Rolph Road, Northlea) and one separate school (St. Anselm). The board merged with East York’s educational overseers when the two municipalities amalgamated in 1967.

Do 1010 Ads Use Stereotypes? We Need to Talk

Originally published on Torontoist on January 27, 2009.

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Sources: Toronto ’59 (left) and CFL Illustrated, July 4, 1978 (right).

The provocative stunt-based advertising campaign currently employed by CFRB has been one of Torontoist’s favourite targets for ridicule. This prompted us to dig deep and see if “Ontario’s Family Station” had any promotional skeletons in the closet, as most old CFRB ads we have encountered tend to be warm and friendly.

You be the judge as to whether this pair of ads, one designed to tout the station’s potential reach during the city’s 125th anniversary, the other meant to draw in Argos fans, retain the quaint, humorous charm the ad designers intended or demonstrate how attitudes towards First Nations people and leering football players have changed since they were published.

Look for representatives of either of these groups holding signs for the station on a street corner near you.

When Restaurateurs Go Editorial

Originally published on Torontoist on February 3, 2009.

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Source: Upper Yonge Villager, July 16, 1982.

Most ads for restaurants tout the eatery’s virtues (smart decor, well-prepared food) or highlight special offers. Less common, unless the restaurant has bought ongoing advertorial space, are spots where the owner takes a stance on burning issues of the day. Ads for Oliver’s in community papers usually highlighted the menu, but today’s pick tackles the economic problems of the early 1980s with the subtlety of a talk radio caller, though modern callers would not tack on an apology to those who enjoy statutory holidays.

Opened in 1978, Oliver’s was the first of a series of restaurants Peter Oliver has operated in the city on his own and as part of the Oliver Bonacini partnership.